Chinese Concert: The Silk Road Impression of Civilization

On September 26, over 20 students, administrators, and faculty from Beijing Language and Culture University will perform in a concert dedicated to promoting intercultural communication and understanding between Chinese and American people. Thirteen acts will perform featuring western Chinese music and dances, most notably long-tune singing, which is unique to the western region of China. These performances will highlight the use of traditional Chinese instruments like the erhu, the guzheng, and the horse-head fiddle, a traditional Mongolian stringed instrument. The horse-head fiddle is one of the most important traditional instruments of the Mongol people and has been labeled a masterpiece by UNESCO’s Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity registration.

This project is sponsored by the Hanban Confucius Institute in Beijing, China. This Institute also sponsors the Confucius Classroom project at Johnson University. This troupe will also perform at Western Kentucky University, Xavier University, and the University of the Bahamas. Many folk songs and traditional Chinese dances will be featured in this concert. The theme of the concert, The Silk Road Impression of Civilization, is also the title of a dance designed to illustrate the richness of Chinese culture and will be performed by the whole troupe as a gesture of friendship to the audience.

The concert will begin at 7PM and is held in the Phillips-Welshimer Gym at Johnson University Tennessee. Because the mission of the concert is to strengthen friendships between Johnson University and Chinese institutions of higher education, admission is free. Many members of the local community will be in attendance, including members from local churches and schools. You will not want to miss this beautiful demonstration of traditional Chinese musical culture!

Posted: 9/11/2017 2:36:39 PM

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