2017 April Faculty News TN

The faculty members of Johnson University participate in many activities beyond their normal teaching responsibilities, including writing, speaking, presenting at academic meetings, mission trips, and community involvement. The list below describes faculty activities in April 2017.

Adam Bean (Lecturer in History) co-chaired a newly formed “Old Testament in Ancient Near-Eastern Context” study group at the 2017 Stone-Campbell Journal Meeting held at Johnson University on April 7-8. He presented in that session a paper entitled “Divine Identity Crises in Ancient Israel and the Near East.”

Susan Calderon (Lecturer in Intercultural Studies) is currently serving as the local arrangements treasurer for the Convención Nacional Cristiana, which will be held on campus from July 18 to 20. She is also the assistant treasurer and church secretary for the Christian Church of Fountain City and the Secretary for the Leadership Committee of the Iglesia Cristiana Vida Nueva, which meets at Woodlawn Christian Church.

Alicia Crumpton (Professor of Leadership Studies & Ph.D. Program Director) served on an accreditation team for the Association for Biblical Higher Education.

Heather Gorman (Associate Professor of New Testament) presented a paper entitled “The Reception of Jesus in the Embodiments of Early Christian Prayer” at the Stone-Campbell Journal Conference at Johnson University on April 7.

James Gorman (Assistant Professor of History) published a book review of J. Caleb Clanton, The Philosophy of Religion of Alexander Campbell (Knoxville: The University of Kentucky Press, 2013), in Restoration Quarterly 59, no. 1 (2017): 55-56. He presented a paper titled “Historiography of the Stone-Campbell Movement: Why Historians Have Portrayed a Transatlantic Movement as American” at the Stone-Campbell Journal Conference at Johnson University on April 8. He also continued his duties as assistant editor of Stone-Campbell Journal, arranging peer reviews and editing articles covering Stone-Campbell history and theology. He served as Johnson University's onsite coordinator for the Stone-Campbell Journal Conference. He also played bass one week in chapel.

April Kilinski (Professor of English and Literature) presented a paper at the MELUS (Multi Ethnic Literature in the United States) conference, which was held at MIT in Boston from April 27 to 30. The title of the paper was “Realizing the Other: Mirta Ojito’s Finding Manana: A Memoir of Cuban Exodus.”

Gregory Linton (Professor of New Testament, Vice Provost for Academic Services) served on an accreditation team for the Association for Biblical Higher Education from April 18 to 21. He also attended a lecture by Stephen Collins-Elliott on “Going West: The 2016 Pilot Season of the ‘Gardens of the Hesperides’ Project—Rural Archaeology of the Loukkos Valley, Northern Morocco” at the East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, which was held at McClung Museum on the campus of the University of Tennessee on April 11.

Carrie Beth Lowe (Library Director) attended the Tennessee Library Association annual conference at the Knoxville Convention Center on April 6-7. She also attended the Appalachian

College Association’s library directors meeting on March 30-31 at the ACA office in Richmond, Kentucky She had two book reviews published in The Christian Librarian.

Gerald Mattingly (Professor of Intercultural Studies) attended a lecture by Stephen Collins-Elliott on “Going West: The 2016 Pilot Season of the ‘Gardens of the Hesperides’ Project—Rural Archaeology of the Loukkos Valley, Northern Morocco” at the East Tennessee Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, which was held at McClung Museum on the campus of the University of Tennessee on April 11. On April 19, he began teaching a new Bible study on the Book of Numbers on Wednesday evenings at Gap Creek Christian Church.

Wilbur Reid (Professor of Business Administration & M.B.A. Program Director) and Jay Clark (Affiliate Faculty for the M.B.A.) conducted a 3-day leadership training seminar in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, for influential bivocational pastors who lead thousands of followers from both registered and underground churches. They then travelled to Dalian, China, to lead a 2-day leadership seminar with 28 church leaders.

Since January, Chris Templar (Professor of Education Emeritus) and other faculty of the Templar School of Education have hosted a professor and a high school teacher from China. On most weekends, Dr. Templar has taken them out on Saturday trips and then to church on Sunday, giving them an opportunity to see American culture and American church life. During the Easter season, they visited six different special Easter events that showed both the meaning of Easter and the secular side of Easter. This experience led to lengthy discussions about what it meant to be a Christian. As a result, one of them decided to become a Christian and was baptized at Gap Creek Christian Church.

Posted: 6/6/2017 9:31:41 AM

 

Opinions expressed are those of the contributors and do not necessarily represent those of Johnson University.